Cryptolocker is back – Ransomware beware!

Cryptolocker is back – Ransomware beware!

Cryptolocker the planet’s worst ransomware trojan has reappeared in all its ugly forms. Across the world networks and computer files have been encrypted by this trojan before a ransom demand is made to the user or administrator. Some victims who don’t have adequate backup are losing all their files, or having to pay a ransom of thousands to the criminals who propagate this electronic curse. Cryptolocker is propagated via infected email attachments, and via abotnet; when activated, the malware encrypts certain types of files stored on local and mounted network drives using RSA public key cryptography. Cryptolocker itself is readily removed, however encrypted files will remain locked unless the key is provided. Worse some who have paid the ransom, have not had the key provided being left with encrypted files and a big bill. It is estimated that around 3% of affected users pay the ransom requested. Almost a year ago the US Department of Justice announced that the FBI and Interpol had publicly issued an indictment against a Russian hacker and had gained the keys to the malware. However it appears a new version and clones such as CryptoWall and TorrentLocker are back in business, Security software is designed to detect such threats, however it may not detect Cryptolocker at all, or only after encryption is underway or complete, particularly if a new version unknown to the protective software. To how do you get Cryptolocker? Email is the primary entry point for the Cryptolocker Trojan into networks and computers. Cryptolocker typically is propagated as an attachment to a seemingly innocuous e-mail message, which appears to have been sent...
Are You Protecting Your Clients’ Private Information on Your Network and Devices?

Are You Protecting Your Clients’ Private Information on Your Network and Devices?

There’s a long list of improvements that technology has delivered, but a major downside is cybercrime. The theft of digital information has become the most commonly reported type of criminal fraud. Surprisingly, the theft of digital information has actually surpassed physical theft. When Sony was recently hacked they stole 100TB of data – everything they could find – emails, movies, passwords, & payroll information. Cybercrime: A Big Danger for Small Businesses While financial institutions and large companies have been strengthening their networks against attacks, cybercriminals have begun targeting less well-defended small businesses. Small businesses are attacked everyday, it just doesn’t make the news like a massive data breach at Sony or Target. If you aren’t convinced that it’s a major problem, the following information based on a 2013 survey conducted by the US National Small Business Association: 44% of small businesses have been victims of cyber attacks. The average cyber attack costs a small business $8,700. Business must often pay to notify customers of a data breach and also pay for credit monitoring for customers with compromised information. Companies are potentially liable for damages in lawsuits brought by customers with compromised information. Protect Your Clients and Your Business Computer Troubleshooters offers the following recommendations to increase the security of your network and to safeguard your clients’ valuable personal and financial information: Cybersecurity Awareness: Awareness, education and training is actually the first line of defense when it comes to protecting your business and clients from cybercrime. Establish a cybersecurity plan and policies for employees that requires the use of passwords; guidelines for handling Secure Your Wi-Fi Network: You must password...

Why you need to protect against Thunder Storms?

It is the season for thunderstorm activity across Australia. Recent storms have caused havoc with IT equipment in office & homes for our clients. Last week’s storm in Sydney fried computers, printers, cable modems and backup external drives, let alone more expensive business equipment such as servers. No one who got equipment fried actually got struck by lightning, so why did they lose multiple pieces of equipment in one wild storm and most importantly how do you stop it happening to you or your business. Most technology depends on a clean, uninterrupted supply of electricity. Unfortunately, inconsistencies in your electrical supply or a sudden complete loss of power can cause major damage to computer systems and other sensitive equipment. Electrical supply is subjected to ‘brownouts’, surges and even complete outages. ‘Brownouts’ are momentary slumps in supply, to a level under 100 volts. They are frequently caused by electrical storms, creating a momentary drain on the power supply. Brownouts can affect a computer even if the voltage dip cannot be ‘seen’ (e.g. the lights in the room dimming). And if they don’t crash your PC, they can cause stresses that can shorten the life of its components. Surges of power often follow brownouts as the power rebounds back to normal, and can have similar effects caused by too much voltage. Surges are common in areas where lines are hung on poles that are exposed to lightening, while the lightening may not hit the line the storms electrical activity is enough to cause variations in the voltage. What devices will protect my systems from electrical issues: Surge/power filters or protectors are...

Be Sure You Are Protected Against Computer Viruses

By the late 1980’s, computers were becoming increasingly popular and almost immediately computer viruses arrived on the scene like a plague of destructive locusts. No one is celebrating the fact that computer viruses have now been around for over 28 years. Especially considering that over this time there have been a number of viruses that have wreaked havoc worldwide. The key to combating the ongoing threat of malicious computer viruses is a combination of vigilance and protection. Since computer viruses aren’t going away anytime soon, Computer Troubleshooters wants to help you stay safe by providing information about how these viruses spread and how to protect your computer. What is a Computer Virus? The defining characteristic of a virus is that it’s a self-replicating program that has become installed on a computer without the user’s knowledge or consent. It’s a secret program that is typically hidden within the code of another known program. Once that program is activated, the virus begins infecting the computer by inserting its own replicating code within files. The bad news is that viruses spread quickly. The symptoms of a virus can range from a completely non-responsive computer to spontaneous crashing and corrupted data. A virus can also delete everything on the hard drive, use the email program to spread itself to other computers and display annoying messages on the screen. How Does a Computer Become Infected with a Virus? Computer viruses spread across the Internet through online downloads of infected audio and video files. Frequently, viruses are contained within illicit software that is downloaded from the Internet. Viruses also come disguised within e-mail attachments, via...